Our February White Paper–Duplicate Forms W-2

It is now the season for the requests for duplicate copies of the Form W-2 to begin, if they haven’t already.  It amazes me how many people seem to “lose, misplace or never get” their Form W-2.   No matter how hard I work to remind them to check your address at the end of the year, watch your mail box, or better yet, get an electronic copy  you can’t “lose” I still get requests every year for duplicate-form-w-2-for-2016duplicates. So how should payroll handled duplicate requests?  Should you have your own form?  Is there a required time frame for reissuing?  Can I charge a fee?  These are just some of the questions we discuss in our February white paper.  We hope you find it interesting and informative.

 

White Paper: Duplicate Form W-2 Requests

Our Latest White Paper–Year End Memo Makes Sense

Our new white paper is on the topic of sending out a year end memo to your employees.  This memo contains pertinent information that the employees need to know.  So this memo not only helps your employees but also cuts down on questions coming your way from those same employees.  We hope you find the information useful.

white-paper-year-end-memo-dec-2016

 

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Where does Payroll Belong?

This has been a question I have been asked ever since I began in payroll in 1977.  Does payroll report to human resources (personnel way back then) or to finance?  Where should the functionality and operations of payroll be housed? And it is not a questions with a simple answer.This age old question is the heart  of the APA’s next PayNewsChat on Thursday, December 8 at 3pm Eastern time. Dan Dycus, CPP, APA’s Senior Director of Education Services, and Jodi Parsons, CPP, Director of Payroll for the Kansas City Royals Baseball Club, will share their thoughts with you during this half-hour talk at #PayNews Chat. You can be of the conversation by using the chat portal Twubs or participate directly on Twitter by following along with #paynews and including the hashtag in your tweets.  Be a part of the conversation if you can.

New OT Rules Update: DOL Vows to Fight On

On November 22, 2016, U.S. District Court Judge Amos Mazzant granted an Emergency Motion for Preliminary Injunction and thereby enjoined the Department of Labor from implementing and enforcing the Overtime Final Rule on December 1, 2016. The case was heard in the United States District Court, Eastern District of Texas, Sherman Division (State of Nevada ET AL v. United States Department of Labor ET AL No: 4:16-CV-00731).  The DOL has issued the following concerning the ruling:

The rule updated the standard salary level and provided a method to keep the salary level current to better effectuate Congress’s intent to exempt bona fide white collar workers from overtime protections.

On December 1, 2016, the Department of Justice on behalf of the Department of Labor filed a notice to appeal the preliminary injunction to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Since 1940, the Department’s regulations have generally required each of three tests to be met for the FLSA’s executive, administrative, and professional (EAP) exemption to apply: (1) the employee must be paid a predetermined and fixed salary that is not subject to reduction because of variations in the quality or quantity of work performed (“salary basis test”); (2) the amount of salary paid must meet a minimum specified amount (“salary level test”); and (3) the employee’s job duties must primarily involve executive, administrative, or professional duties as defined by the regulations (“duties test”). The Department has always recognized that the salary level test works in tandem with the duties tests to identify bona fide EAP employees. The Department has updated the salary level requirements seven times since 1938.

The Department strongly disagrees with the decision by the court. The Department’s Overtime Final Rule is the result of a comprehensive, inclusive rule-making process, and we remain confident in the legality of all aspects of the rule.

New Salary Level Test Rules Blocked

A federal judge has blocked, for now, the new salary level test that was to go into effect December 1st.  Here is an excellent blog post on what exactly that could mean for employers.  The blog is by Bill Pokomy, Staci Ketay Rotman and Erin Fowler of FranczekRadelet.